Last edited by Naramar
Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

3 edition of Atomic hydrogen propellants found in the catalog.

Atomic hydrogen propellants

Atomic hydrogen propellants

historical perspectives and future possibilities

  • 272 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Technical Information Service, distributor in [Washington, DC, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hydrogen as fuel.,
  • Space vehicles -- Propulsion systems.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementBryan Palaszewski.
    SeriesNASA technical memorandum -- 106053.
    ContributionsUnited States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15374589M

    Atomic hydrogen, for use as a fuel or as an explosive, is stored in the presence of a strong magnetic field in exfoliated layered compounds such as molybdenum disulfide or an elemental layer material such as graphite. The compound is maintained at liquid temperatures and the atomic hydrogen is collected on the surfaces of the layered compound which are exposed during delamination (exfoliation). The propellant of choice for an NTR is hydrogen: its low atomic mass means that the atoms are accelerated more per unit energy than any other atom, and even H2 (molecular hydrogen) still weighs less than helium does. However, its low atomic mass also leads to additional complications that are far harder to deal with than other propellants.

    Atomic metallic hydrogen, if metastable at ambient pressure and temperature could be used as the most powerful chemical rocket fuel, as the atoms recombine to form molecular hydrogen. This light-weight high-energy density material would revolutionize rocketry, allowing single-stage rockets to enter orbit and chemically fueled rockets to explore. This book is the unquestionable standard for understanding ALL the events leading up to the detonation of the first Atomic bomb and its subsequent use against Japan. The details are all here.

    Atomic hydrogen, for use as a fuel or as an explosive, is stored in the presence of a strong magnetic field in exfoliated layered compounds such as molybdenum disulfide or an elemental layer material such as graphite. The compound is maintained at liquid helium temperatures and the atomic hydrogen is collected on the surfaces of the layered compound which are exposed during delamination.   Rhodes' book on the history of the atomic bomb was a masterpiece; this, on the buildup to the hydrogen bomb, is merely excellent. The first book has the benefit of a strong through-line and a nice dramatic arc as splitting the atom went from imaginable to possible to inevitable/5().


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Atomic hydrogen propellants Download PDF EPUB FB2

“A prominent physicist once said, "to understand hydrogen is to understand all of physics." That is perhaps a bit of an overstatement; but it is no exaggeration to say that John Rigden's eminently readable book is a unique guide to the overwhelming role in science and technology of that simplest of all elements--from the origin of the universe itself to the most recently created lab Cited by: (PDF) Atomic hydrogen propellants: Historical perspectives and future possibilities | Bryan Palaszewski - is a platform for academics to share research papers.

Applying atomic hydrogen propellants to upper stages was also considered. Very high I(sub sp) (greater than 1b(sub f)/s/lb(sub m) is needed to enable a mass savings over advanced oxygen Author: Bryan Palaszewski. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants Particle size calibrations Run at 72 dpi.

=pixels Particle sizes from Solid Hydrogen video observations Run at 72 dpi. =Author: Bryan Palaszewski. the chemistry of propellants Download the chemistry of propellants or read online books in PDF, EPUB, Tuebl, and Mobi Format.

Click Download or Read Online button to get the chemistry of propellants book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want. propellants such as atomic hydrogen may enable unique launch vehicle propulsion applications.

Atomic hydrogen could deliver a specific impulse between and lbr-s/Ibm performance level and this capability has attracted many researchers over the last 50 years. This paper reviews atomic hydrogen investigations and assesses the current state of the art. Introduction. For over 70 years, the promise of atomic propellants has been investigated (refs.

1 to 35). Using atoms of boron, carbon, or hydrogen, maintained at cryogenic temperatures, very exciting advances in rocket propellants and Atomic hydrogen propellants book fuels can be realized. For over 69 years, the promise of atomic propellants has been pursued (Refs.

1 to 33). Using atoms of boron, carbon, or hydrogen, maintained at cryogenic temperatures, very exciting advances in rocket propellants and airbreathing fuels can be created. Atomic propellants are composed of atomic species stored in cryogenic solid hydrogen particles.

Use of atomic hydrogen might yield a specific impulse of about 1, to 1, seconds. 2 G. WORKING FLUIDS FOR NONCHEMICAL ROCKETS Devices such as the nuclear rocket must use some chemical as a working fluid or propellant, although no energy is supplied to the rocket by any chemical reaction.

Thermal rockets use inert propellants of low molecular weight that are chemically compatible with the heating mechanism at high temperatures.

Solar thermal rockets and nuclear thermal rockets typically propose to use liquid hydrogen for a specific impulse of around – seconds, or in some cases water that is exhausted as steam for a specific impulse of about seconds. Hydrogen -- a light and extremely powerful rocket propellant -- has the lowest molecular weight of any known substance and burns with extreme intensity (5,°F).

In combination with an oxidizer such as liquid oxygen, liquid hydrogen yields the highest specific impulse, or efficiency in relation to the amount of propellant consumed, of any.

Applying atomic hydrogen propellants to upper stages was also considered. Very high I(sub sp) (greater than 1b(sub f)/s/lb(sub m) is needed to enable a mass savings over advanced oxygen/hydrogen propulsion. Associated with the potential benefits of high I(sub sp) atomic hydrogen are several challenging problems.

William Anderson, in Encyclopedia of Energy, Solid Propellants. The propellant in an SRM must burn at the proper rate to maintain the desired thrust profile and must have structural continuity to withstand the pressure and acceleration loads introduced during flight.

Most physical characteristics cannot be predicted analytically, so heavy use of empirical data is required. In the past, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2, an oxidizer) was also used as a monopropellant.

However, it has even lower specific impulse ( sec) than hydrazine. The liquid propellants that give the highest performance are bipropellants.

2 Bipropellants are fuel and oxidizer combinations. We select bipropellants to get the best possible specific. Books. AIAA Education Series; Library of Flight; Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics; The Aerospace Press; Browse All Books; Meeting Papers; Standards; Other Publications.

Software/Electronic Products; Aerospace America ; Public Policy Papers ; Atomic hydrogen was the most promising of these free radicals, which might yield a specific impulse of over 1, seconds, three times that of conventional chemical propellants.

Gas Dynamic Laser Laser propulsion involves using the power of a laser to heat or augment combustion of a mixture of gases. The energy is used to heat the liquid hydrogen propellant. The vehicle depicted is the "Copernicus" an upper stage assembly being designed for the Space Launch System ().

Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rockets conduct nuclear fission reactions similar to those employed at. This paper illustrates experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium.

Solid particles of hydrogen were frozen. Get this from a library. Atomic hydrogen propellants: historical perspectives and future possibilities. [Bryan Alan Richard Palaszewski; United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.].

Amusingly enough, this is the best match for the propulsion system used in the TOM CORBETT: SPACE CADET books. However the books are sufficiently vague that it is possible the Polaris used a nuclear lightbulb. According to technical advisor Willy Ley, "reactant" is the hydrogen propellant, but the books imply that reactant is the liquid uranium.

Atomic hydrogen was the most promising of these free radicals, which might yield a specific impulse of over 1, seconds, three times that of conventional chemical propellants.

Specific impulse: s.Abstract Atomic hydrogen, a very high density free-radical propellant, is anticipated to generate a specific impulse of lb-f sec/lb-mass performance; this may facilitate the development of unique launch vehicles.

A development status evaluation is presently given for atomic hydrogen investigations.Get this from a library! Solid hydrogen experiments for atomic propellants: particle formation, imaging, observations, and analyses.

[Bryan Alan Richard Palaszewski; NASA Glenn Research Center.].